Mechanic Liens

This depends on where you are performing construction services. Here are the general rules:

California: 90 days from completion of entire project (not just your work), unless a Notice of Completion is filed, and then only 60 days from filing of the notice of completion.

Louisiana: 60 days from substantial completion of entire project (not just your work), unless a Notice of Completion is filed, and then only 30 days from filing of the notice of completion.

Washington: 90 days from your last furnishing of labor and/or materials to the project.

Oregon: 75 days from your last furnishing of labor and/or materials to the project.

*Note – these timelines are for private (i.e. non-government) projects. There may be (and often are) different rules governing liens for public jobs.

Whether a notice is required depends on your role on the project and the project’s state. Even when notice is required, there may be applicable exceptions to the rule, so seeking the advice of an attorney is helpful. Here are the general rules:

California: Preliminary notice is required from anyone who did not contract with the property owner directly. Notice must be given within 20 days of first starting work.

Louisiana: Typically no. However, for material suppliers, notice of intent to lien required within 75 days of starting work, or 10 days before filing a lien, whichever is earlier. Equipment rental companies must deliver a notice of lease within 10 days of delivering equipment.

Washington: Preliminary notice required from anyone who did not contract with the property owner directly within 60 days of first starting work.

Oregon: Preliminary notice required from anyone who did not contract with the property owner directly within 8 days of first starting work.

*Note – these timelines are for private (i.e. non-government) projects. There may be (and often are) different rules governing liens for public jobs.

Absolutely not. If there is one fundamental rule about mechanic’s liens that applies uniformly across the United States, it is this: promises to pay will NOT extend your lien deadline.

If you rely on promises of payment and refrain from filing your lien, you will lose all lien rights once the deadline passes.

On the next page, you’ll find easy instructions on how to order your Mechanic’s Lien.